Shanty Tramp (1967)

Born broke, she found a way to make money.. She’d love them all!

 

 

Shanty tramp meets the preacher for the first time. Sparks fly as they both have one thing on their minds. 
Lee Holland only starred in this film according to IMDB. Which is a great shame, I think she has enough talent to have done more.
I will upload more quality moments from this film, it is a true dirty, grind, trashy classic.
Amen preacher.

 

 

The Canterbury Scene – BBC South

via percy_the_ratcatcher

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent

One of the Canterbury Scene’s main men, Daevid Allen talks about how his travels brought him to Canterbury and being part of the Scene.

Australian born Daevid Allen is one of the Canterbury Scene’s leading men. He came to England in the very early sixties, arriving in Canterbury via London. He’s best known as the leader of the Canterbury band Gong.

In this interview he talks about how his travels brought him to Canterbury and whether or not he thinks there was ever a ‘Canterbury Scene’.


Guitarist and singer Steve Hillage came to Canterbury in 1969 to attend university. Within weeks he’d found his way into the Canterbury Scene.

Steve was studying History and Philosophy but spent a good deal of time jamming with other musicians active on the scene in those years. He was particularly friendly with the members of Caravan, and through them he was able to get a record deal.

Steve Hillage talks about his early days in Canterbury.

More about these interviews:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/entertainme…

 

 

 

Although for many years Robert Wyatt denied the existence of The Canterbury Scene he is certainly inextricably linked to Kents own special sound and the bands that developed it into something lasting.

Moving with his parents to Lydden near Dover, before he was a teenager, Wyatt was exposed to all sorts of musical influences from the lodgers who rented rooms in the 14 room house. It was here he met jazz drummer George Neidorf and Australian hippie Daevid Allen. 

Robert Wyatt talks about the early day’s of his musical education.

 

 

 

Originally from Leicestershire, Peter Geoffrey Richardsons playing has graced many a Canterbury Scene track. 

He joined Caravan in 1972 as the viola player but also counts guitar, mandolin and cello amongst the many instruments he can play.

Richardsons arrival in Caravan coincided with the departure of the Richard Sinclair and his cousin David. Some fans objected to his viola replacing Davids keyboards but he became an integral part of the bands developing sound.

He describes how one Caravan track Memory Laine, Hugh was dreamed up.

‘Phil Ochs: There but for Fortune’ – Documentary at IFC

Amplify’d from www.nytimes.com
New York Times

Film

Tracing the Arc of a Tragic Folk Singer

By BOB BAKER
Published: December 22, 2010

IF Kenneth Bowser, a New York documentary filmmaker, succeeds in his crusade to rehabilitate the 1960s protest singer Phil Ochs, he’ll have his daughter to thank.

“Phil Ochs: There but for Fortune” is a documentary examining that 1960s folk singer, who committed suicide in 1976.

Zev Greenfield/Milk & Honey Productions.

Kenneth Bowser, director of the Ochs documentary.

Phil Ochs in 1967.

Mr. Bowser was a teenager during the Vietnam War when he discovered Mr. Ochs, a brilliant, quirky and erratic artist who, plagued by mental illness and alcoholism, committed suicide in 1976 at the age of 35.

Mr. Bowser, who has made PBS documentaries about the directors John Ford and Preston Sturges, began thinking about making a film about Mr. Ochs some 20 years ago. In his vision, the documentary would show how Mr. Ochs had been wrongfully “written out of the history books,” unfair treatment for a man whom Mr. Bowser considers the best protest singer who ever lived — and the most relevant recording artist of the 1960s. A mention of Bob Dylan, whose protest songs disappeared early in his career as he turned his gifts to the surrealistically personal, is an easy way to inflame Mr. Bowser. While Mr. Dylan was recording “Maggie’s Farm,” Mr. Ochs was recording a war-resistance anthem called “I Ain’t Marchin’ Anymore.”:

Oh I marched to the battle of New Orleans

At the end of the early British War.

Young land started growing

The young blood started flowing

But I ain’t marchin’ anymore

Mr. Bowser and other voices — Pete Seeger, Peter Yarrow (of Peter, Paul and Mary), Joan Baez and Tom Hayden — pepper the film with praise for Mr. Ochs’s history-driven, pamphlet-style songs: forceful, angry and cleverly absurd lessons about society’s evil and unfair circumstances; Tom Paine with a guitar.

Whether Mr. Bowser can breed another generation of Phil Ochs fanatics will rest on critical and word-of-mouth reaction to “Phil Ochs: There but for Fortune,” a title from an Ochs song people are more likely to associate with Ms. Baez’s cover version. The documentary opens on Jan. 5 in New York at the IFC Center and in nine other American cities through March.

A lack of money for music rights blew out every budget Mr. Bowser drew up during the ’90s, and the project languished. Then, 10 years ago, his daughter Samantha, 4 at the time, heard him playing a tribute to Mr. Ochs by the leftist British singer Billy Bragg.

“I told her about Phil, and she said, ‘Daddy, why don’t you make a film about him?’ ” Mr. Bowser said. “When a little girl asks that question, you take it seriously.”

Mr. Bowser had just finished directing several “Saturday Night Live” greatest-hits episodes for NBC, so money was now less of a hurdle. And he had done business with Mr. Ochs’s younger brother, Michael Ochs, Phil’s sometimes-manager and a photograph broker who was willing to produce.

Telling the beginning was easy. Mr. Ochs’s evolution as a leftist hero started on a patriotic note: his parents sent him to military school, where he showed talent on the clarinet. Later, at Ohio State University, he fancied his roommate’s guitar and won it by betting that John F. Kennedy would beat Richard Nixon in the 1960 election. Two years later he followed the roommate to Greenwich Village, where folk singers tried to shed their anonymity. Mr. Ochs filtered a litany of heroes and villains through his songs, with an insistent style determined that every word be heard. Even a tribute to America, “The Power and the Glory,” from his first album, “All the News That’s Fit to Sing,” cautioned:

“Yet she’s only as rich as the poorest of her poor/Only as free as the padlocked prison door.”

From 1965 to mid-1968, when violence swept America’s political landscape, Mr. Ochs was at his peak, writing songs like “Draft Dodger Rag” and “The War Is Over.” “It’s wrong to expect a reward for your struggles,” he told an interviewer. “The reward is the act of struggle itself, not what you win.”

Mr. Ochs’s bipolar disorder created a heightened sensitivity to events around him, friends say in the film. Mr. Ochs demanded that he and his brother, who suffers from a different form of the same condition, take a pledge never to incarcerate the other in a mental home.

Phil Ochs’s fragility would weigh heavily on him. He was convinced that the idea of America had died at the violent 1968 Democratic National Convention. The cover of his 1969 album, “Rehearsals for Retirement,” had a picture of his grave with the partial inscription: “Died in Chicago, Illinois, 1968.”

Mr. Bowser captures how Mr. Ochs’s style began to reflect a bit less certainty and more vulnerability. Now the hero was not so sure in his righteousness. He sounded paranoid. The songs were a sort of protest/baroque, including one of essay length, “Crucifixion,” about how heroes like Jesus and John F. Kennedy are ritually destroyed by their overworshipful fans. The immortality he craved eluded him; most music fans either loved him or had never heard of him.

He held a 1970 concert at Carnegie Hall, where the audience backlash prompted demands for the “real” Phil Ochs as he played covers of rock and pop songs while wearing a gold lamé suit. In 1973, while touring Africa, he was mugged, suffering irreparable damage to his vocal cords. And then three disappointing years later, he was gone and history closed an eye.

One reason for that, Mr. Bowser said, was that Mr. Ochs reminded many people of their failures. “A lot of us thought we had life by the hair and it got away from us,” he said. “Phil’s story becomes the struggle with the failure of those times.”

Michael Ochs said that another obstacle Mr. Bowser faced was society’s cynicism about mental illness. “People get M.S., people get cancer, but people are manic-depressive,” he said, adding that “it turns people off, it makes us real standoffish.”

Whether a documentary can even out history’s verdict is problematic, said Todd Boyd, who holds a chair in race and culture at the University of Southern California’s film school. Cinema is a subjective medium, he said, because every director walks in with a point of view.

“There’s no way to objectively measure a musician’s influence,” he said, and quoted a line from John Sayles’s “Lone Star”: “You may call it history, but I call it propaganda.”

A version of this article appeared in print on December 26, 2010, on page AR10 of the New York edition.

Read more at www.nytimes.com

The Smiths – Unreleased Demos & Instrumentals [Bootleg Vinyl Rip]

Amplify’d from ghostcapital.blogspot.com
ghostcapital

The Smiths – Unreleased Demos & Instrumentals [Bootleg Vinyl Rip]

This rip of unreleased Smith’s demos has been in interweb circulation for a hot-minute now, but another mention wouldn’t hurt. Its big news, as these demos (including 2 Marr instrumentals) hadn’t yet seen the light of day. Smiths fans, rejoice (myself included):

The Smiths – Unreleased Demos & Instrumentals [Bootleg Vinyl Rip]

<span>The Smiths, ‘Untitled One’ (aka ‘I Misses You’) by Slicing Up Eyeballs</span>

The Hand That Rocks The Cradle
Reel Around The Fountain
Rusholme Ruffians
The Queen Is Dead
Sheila Take A Bow
This Night Has Opened My Eyes
Untitled One (Marr Instrumental)
Ask
There Is A Light That Never Goes Out
Is It Really So Strange?
Frankly, Mr. Shankly
Shoplifters Of The World Unite (Reprise)
Girlfriend In A Coma
Death Of A Disco Dancer
Paint A Vulgar Picture
Untitled Two (Marr Instrumental)

Posted by nicholab

Read more at ghostcapital.blogspot.com

Connecting the notes – Captain Beefheart part 1 of 2 (w. interview)

via The Stash Dauber

Amplify’d from www.radio4all.net
A-Infos Radio Project

Program Information
Connecting the notes – Captain Beefheart part 1 of 2 (w. interview)
Series:  Connecting the notes 
Subtitle:  
Program Type:  Music
Featured Speakers/Commentators:  John French, Gary Lucas
Contributor:  Matthew Ray  [Contact Contributor]
Summary:  An hour long biographical radio program focusing on a differnt musical personality each week. Visit us online at www.connectingthenotes.com or contact us by emailing connectingthenotes@yahoo.com . All shows originally aired live on Valley Free Radio, 103.3 FM WXOJ-LP in Northampton, MA
Credits: 
Notes: Captain Beefheart & The Magic Band are the focus of this special 2-part edition of Connecting the Notes. We are joined by 2 former Magic Band members: John French & Gary Lucas. They talk with us about Beefheart’s approach to songwriting, the making of the album “Trout Mask Replica” and the struggles and rewards of working with him.

Playlist:

*all songs performed by Captain Beefheart & The Magic Band unless otherwise noted

Electricity
Yellow Brick Road (partial)
Diddy Wah Diddy
Abba Zaba
The Past Sure Is Tense
Moonlight On Vermont
Ella Guru
Fallin Ditch
Sugar N’ Spikes
Hair Pie: Bake 2
Peon (partial)

Listen To Part 2 Here: http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/48100

Version 1: Connecting the notes – Captain Beefheart part 1 Download Program Podcast
Description:
Length (hh:mm:ss): 00:59:00 Language: English Date Recorded: 2010-12-01
Location Recorded:  WXOJ-LP Northampton, MA
Announcer Script/Transcript:   View Script
Label  Length  File Info Downloads  
 00:59:00  128Kbps mp3
(55MB) Stereo
39

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Connecting the notes – Captain Beefheart part 2 of 2 (w. interview)

via The Stash Dauber

Amplify’d from www.radio4all.net
A-Infos Radio Project

Program Information
Connecting the notes – Captain Beefheart part 2 of 2 (w. interview)
Series:  Connecting the notes 
Subtitle:  
Program Type:  Music
Featured Speakers/Commentators:  
Contributor:  Matthew Ray  [Contact Contributor]
Broadcast Advisory:  Warning: Program may contain strong or potentially offensive language, including possible FCC violations.
Summary:  An hour long biographical radio program focusing on a differnt musical personality each week. Visit us online at www.connectingthenotes.com or contact us by emailing connectingthenotes@yahoo.com . All shows originally aired live on Valley Free Radio, 103.3 FM WXOJ-LP in Northampton, MA
Credits: 
Notes: Captain Beefheart & The Magic Band are the focus of this special 2-part edition of Connecting the Notes. We are joined by 2 former Magic Band members: John French & Gary Lucas. They talk with us about Beefheart’s approach to songwriting, the making of the album “Trout Mask Replica” and the struggles and rewards of working with him.

This is Part Two!
Listen to Part 1 here: http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/47894

Playlist:

*all songs by Captain Beefheart & The Magic Band unless otherwise noted

Smithsonian Institute Blues
Gimme Dat Harp Boy
Nowadays a Woman’s Gotta Hit a Man
Her Eyes Are a Blue Million Miles
Big Eyed Beans From Venus
Cardboard Cutout Sundown
Flavor Bud Living
Frank Zappa – Willie The Pimp
Frank Zappa – Poofter’s Froth Wyoming Plans Ahead
Ice Cream For Crow
Dropout Boogie

Disclaimer: Part 2 is uncensored and contains language not fit to broadcast. For a trimmed down, clean version for broadcast, please contact connectingthenotes@yahoo.com

Also, Don Van Vliet passed away on December 17, 2010, Weeks after these shows originally aired. The end of this program has been edited to reflect this sad news.

RIP Don Van Vliet.

Version 1: Connecting the notes – Captain Beefheart part 2 Download Program Podcast
Description:
Length (hh:mm:ss): 00:59:57 Language: English Date Recorded: 2010-12-07
Location Recorded:  WXOJ-LP Northampton, MA
Announcer Script/Transcript:   View Script
Label  Length  File Info Downloads  
 00:59:57  128Kbps mp3
(56MB) Stereo
20

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